Letters to the Port Stephens Examiner: November 8

Problem on horizon

In regard to the recent article ‘Seniors living rises’ (Examiner, October 25) has Port Stephens Council even remotely considered the lack of health services available when approving these developments?

Not only this one but the other three over 50s lifestyle villages being built?

 It’s all well and good when people retire here reasonably healthy at 55 or plus, but within 10-20 years, we have a massive population requiring complex medical facilities which simply are not here (nor planned for).

Their family support systems are still in Sydney or Victoria, so they are then reliant on the meager transport options available and drain our emergency services to make up the short fall.

Try planning ahead PSC.

Melissa Lonie, Soldiers point

SIGHT: A humpback whale calf breached three times inside the Port off Little Beach recently, raising concerns about the proximity of jet skis. Picture: Leanne Maffesoni

SIGHT: A humpback whale calf breached three times inside the Port off Little Beach recently, raising concerns about the proximity of jet skis. Picture: Leanne Maffesoni

Where’s the commitment

The Examiner recently reported that the Liberal candidate for the seat of Port Stephens said that she would continue to fight for the compulsory acquisition of the Mambo wetlands site that was sold, ‘by mistake’, more than two years ago by the Liberal State government.

The compulsory acquisition of land in NSW should take about four months, from the time a Proposed Acquisition Notice is issued to the owner and the final acquisition of the land by the government.

So the candidate’s statement that she would continue to fight for the compulsory acquisition of the land, without a result, is a concern. One must question the level of influence and effectiveness within the Liberal Party and more so, as a proposed member of State parliament. 

The residents of Port Stephens and the Member for Port Stephens, Kate Washington, have been advocating for the compulsory acquisition of the land ever since it was sold ‘by mistake’ in 2016.

Kate Washington has secured a commitment from the Labor party that it will compulsorily acquire the land when in government. That’s what real politicians do, act decisively, positively and effectively for the benefit of their electorate.

Grant Kennett, Corlette 

Related reading

What’s more important

Because of the disturbance by jet skis too close to her calf, I wonder if the mother humpback whale off Little Beach last week will avoid Port Stephens next year as an unsafe place?

Passengers took photos of registration numbers and water police were called to another group of jet skiers off Cabbage Tree Island later that morning who were obviously too close and disturbing another mother/calf pair. Jet skis cannot be heard under water and pose a real threat to our resident dolphins and other marine life.

Perhaps it is time to assess whether jet skis or whales/dolphins are the more important visitors to our Port?

David Fitzgerald, Tanilba Bay

Ask before helping

Guide Dogs NSW/ACT recently launched our new Cane Do campaign as part of White Cane Day, reminding members of the community what they ‘cane do’ to help people using a white cane navigate public spaces in a safe and independent way.

A recent survey of our clients Australia-wide revealed two thirds of people who use white canes have been grabbed or handled by a member of the public, even though they didn’t ask for help.

By grabbing a person with a white cane by the arm to help them onto public transport or across the road – without their consent or prior knowledge – you can disorient them or break the concentration they are using to follow a path.

We’re reminding well-meaning members of the community that the most simple, effective and helpful thing you can do, is directly ask a person using a white cane if they need assistance before trying to help.

Dale Cleaver, CEO of Guide Dogs NSW/ACT