Something Fishy | The humble bream is our reliable favourite

Of all the fish that Port Stephens have to offer, I reckon the humble bream would be the most commonly caught.

From the head of the Karuah River, Tilligerry Creek and the extensive Myall Lake system, bream make their way into the clear water of the port and out to sea on their annual spawning run.

BREAM CENTRAL: Eight year old Boat Harbour champion Noah Bartlett with his 1.1kg bream.

BREAM CENTRAL: Eight year old Boat Harbour champion Noah Bartlett with his 1.1kg bream.

Throughout the year, bream gather in the shade of the oyster racks that fringe the port.

They cruise through the oyster encrusted mangroves on the top of the tide in search of prawns, fingerlings and small shellfish.

Big bream take up residence along the Nelson Bay breakwall and provide hours of entertainment for those who gather to float baits on the change of tide.

Closer to the mouth, bream school off the Torpedo Tube in the shade of Tomaree Headland.

Although difficult to reach, one of the very best spots for bream is the Grit Hole on Fingal Island.

Made famous in Arthur Murdoch's book "Sheer Grit" the Grit Hole is a natural water hole on the northern face of the island which fills on the top of the tide.

The most beautiful bream swim the beaches following the mullet run. Stockton and Fingal Beaches are the pick.

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